AUUF
450 E. Thach Ave.
Auburn, AL 36830

The AUUF graciously donates the use of their historic building to Sundilla and other local organizations.

Bailey Jones
P: 334.741.7169
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Date: March 6th, 2020
Time: 7:30 PM until 9:30 PM

Rebecca Loebe’s star continues to climb, but that’s not stopping her from returning to Sundilla, on Friday, March 6!

Showtime at the AUUf is 7:30. Advance tickets are just $15 and can be found at Spicer’s Music, Ross House Coffee, and online at www.sundillamusic.com; admission at the door will be $20.

Free coffee, tea, water and food will be available, and attendees are welcome to bring their own favorite food or beverage.

Rebecca Loebe is not just another talent. She’s a talent — a sophisticated, mature writer with a relevant point of view and an assured, nuanced voice that’s both elegant and earthy, powerful and delicate, with a range and depth she hints at more than flashes. When the moment’s right, however, she’ll glide up a scale like Norah Jones, or drop right into a crag in Fiona Apple’s sidewalk. And now she’s on a guerrilla mission to share messages others need to hear as well. “I like to write catchy songs about topics that are meaningful to me, but use fun hooks to put words in people's mouths,” Loebe admits. “My favorite thing is to get people singing along before they even realize they're singing about women's equality or their own self-worth.” Inventively marrying elements of folk, pop, rock, blues and jazz, Loebe takes vocal left turns when you think she’ll go right, or shifts from breezy to profound in a single phrase. And each surprising twist makes her music that much more entrancing. Born in Virginia and raised in Atlanta, Loebe was always musical. She picked up a guitar at 11 and honed her vocals in high school (where she also joined the wrestling team). After graduating at 16, she became the second-youngest member of her class at Berklee College of Music, and one of too few women studying audio engineering. But when a mentor encouraged her to stay creative, she realized she wanted to sing the songs she’d secretly written for years. It didn’t take her long to cast her spell over Kerrville Folk Festival New Folk Competition judges, who made her a winner in 2009, and talent scouts for The Voice, who asked her to audition for the show’s debut season. (Her version of Nirvana’s “Come as You Are” charted worldwide and landed on the show’s first compilation album.) Two years later, Alternate Root magazine ranked her ninth on its list of America’s top female vocalists.